The Thermal InfraRed Sensor (TIRS) is a new instrument carried onboard the Landsat 8 satellite that is dedicated to capturing temperature-specific information.  Using radiation information from the two electromagnetic spectral bands covered by this sensor, it is possible to estimate the temperature at the Earth’s surface (albeit at a 100m resolution, compared to the 30m resolution of the other instrument, the Operational Land Imager).

I used data from the TIRS to estimate the surface temperature in the city-state of Delhi, India as of the 29th of May, 2013.  The relevant tarball file containing the data was downloaded using the United States’ Geological Survey’s (USGS) EarthExplorer tool; the area of interest was encompassed by [scene identifier: path 146 row 040] in the WRS-2 scheme. I think I’ll leave the specific explanations describing WRS-2, path/row values and the other miscellaneous small data-management operations for a later post. For now, I’ll let it be understood that these are important things to know when in the process of actually obtaining this data. When the tarball is unpacked fully, the bands from the TIRS instrument are bands 10 and 11;  the relevant .tif files are [“identifier”_B10.tif] and [“identifier”_B11.tif], and these were clipped to the administrative boundary of Delhi. There’s also a text file containing metadata: [“identifier”_MTL.txt] is essential for the math we’re going to do on these two bands.

 

Delhi as seen by Landsat 8 Band 10 (TIRS)
Delhi as seen by Landsat 8 Band 10 (TIRS)

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